19th century

Women’s History Walking Tours are Back for Summer 2016

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Our Women’s History Walking Tour of Ocean Grove is back by popular demand! Led by history professor Dr. Lyndell O’Hara, this tour takes participants to various stops in Ocean Grove where women made history. Costumed performers portray history’s characters, such as physician Margaret Coleman, evangelist Phoebe Palmer, and innkeeper sisters Lydia and Matilda Bull. Tour is on foot and lasts approximately 90 minutes.

This year you have three opportunities to join the tour:

Thursday, June 30, 2016 at 10:30 AM

Thursday, July 28, 2016 at 10:30 AM

Thursday, August 25, 2016 at 10:30 AM

Tickets $12, $10 for seniors

Tour meets at the Historical Society of Ocean Grove, 50 Pitman Avenue

To reserve, call 732-774-1869

Just for fun, we made a movie-style trailer for the tour (see below). Looking forward to seeing you in Ocean Grove this summer!

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Women’s History Walking Tour of Ocean Grove, NJ

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Are you curious about our Women’s History Walking Tour? We don’t blame you! Last summer it was such a huge success, we’re bringing it back again! Led by historian Dell O’Hara, the tour travels on foot through charming Ocean Grove, New Jersey, stopping at sites connected to remarkable women who lived or visited here in the past. It’s partly a “living history” tour, with volunteer residents dressed in costume, portraying real women from the 19th century — innkeepers, a spiritual leader, a physician and more.

You have three opportunities to catch the tour in 2015:

June 25th – 10:30 AM
July 23rd — 1:00 PM
August 20th — 1:00 PM

Reservations are a MUST. Tour is $10 per person, $8 for seniors. Call 732-774-1869.

Hope you enjoy this video trailer we put together with scenes from last year’s tours:

Video by Mary Solecki
Funding has been provided by the New Jersey Historical Commission.

Then and Now: The Broadmoor

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Today’s “Then and Now” features The Broadmoor:

Broadmoor Then and Now

In the late 19th century, Ocean Grove, New Jersey was teeming with lady business owners, most of whom presided over hotels and guest houses. One of those ladies was Elizabeth Sherman Moore.

Miss Moore owned The Broadmoor Hotel at the corner of Central Avenue and Broadway. As early as 1881, the property belonged to her married sister Emogen Hewson, but at some point ownership was transferred to Elizabeth.

Elizabeth Moore seems to have enjoyed being a businesswoman. In March of 1889, she decided to expand her holdings and contracted with the firm of Carman & Holbrook to build two more houses, which she would later call the Holly and Laurel Cottages. It cost her $3,500.

The “Carman” of Carman & Holbrook was William H. Carman: Civil War veteran, Freemason, Democrat, and builder/architect whose firm erected many of the earliest homes and hotels in Ocean Grove.

Now I can’t help but wonder what Miss Moore thought about her hired contractor. Did she find Mr. Carman handsome? As she chatted with him over cottage blueprints, did she blush?

Ah, but what did it matter? He was a married man, after all.

But as fate would have it, in 1894, Mr. Carman’s wife passed away. She had been ailing for several years.

Four years later, on Christmas Day, a wedding took place in the parlor at The Broadmoor — that of William H. Carman to the landlady herself, Elizabeth S. Moore.

While the second Mrs. Carman enjoyed life as a hotelier, Mr. Carman’s business thrived. He was also appointed aide-de-camp on the staff of Commander in Chief of the Grand Army of the Republic for the department of New Jersey, and was appointed as a member of the election board in Ocean Grove. He was known to speak to schoolchildren about his time in the Civil War and loved walking alongside his fellow vets on parade.

He also found time to champion the cause of introducing gaslight to Ocean Grove. He felt it was necessary for the advancement of Ocean Grove, and was quick to remind folks that it was cheaper than electric lights.

Carman was the kind of guy you’d like to have for a neighbor. Mr. W.J. Cramer would certainly know. Late one January night in 1896, he was cooking up some kind of turpentine concoction in the kitchen of 107 Embury Avenue when the substance caught fire. Cramer tried to throw the pot out the back door, but instead he wound up dropping it and soon the kitchen woodwork was in flames. Luckily for Mr. Cramer, William Carman was just two doors down. Carman rushed in with a bucket of water and helped douse the flames.

Never a dull moment in Ocean Grove for Mr. or Mrs. Carman!

William H. Carman died in 1916 and Elizabeth Moore Carman in 1918. Several years before her death, Mrs. Carman had become a semi-invalid due to a fall and a fractured hip, and it seems The Broadmoor passed into the care of a Mrs. M.H. Hennig. Here’s an ad from The Ocean Grove Times of July 6, 1916, trumpeting Mrs. Hennig’s skill in the kitchen:

broadmoor adLike Mrs. Hennig, future owners of The Broadmoor would keep its name, although sometimes with slight variations (like the Broadmoor “Inn” of 1932). Eventually it would become, and stay, a private residence.

Kim Brittingham

Funding has been provided by the New Jersey Historical Commission.